PLEASE SUPPORT THE 100th ANNIVERSARY

OF THE END OF WORLD WAR I

November 11, 1918 - Armistice/Veterans Day 

Proceeds from the sale of the "Two Centennials" booklet go to the Centennial Committee who has been responsible for the following:

The Stabilization and the permanent display of the

Historic 1749 Courthouse Bell.

The Centennial of the 1917 Court House in October 2017.

The Centennial of WWl in Chesterfield County 1918-2018.

 

 

 

 FLANDERS RED POPPY Seeds

$2.00/packet

 

Why has the Poppy become a symbol of death, renewal and life?

 

The answer is half history, half biology. The common or “corn” poppy grows throughout the U.S., Asia, Africa and Europe and is native to the Mediterranean region.  The seeds of the flower can remain dormant in the soil for decades, but once the ground is disturbed and the seeds come to light, they will bloom spectacularly.

 

During World War I, this remarkable phenomenon took place on the battlefields of Europe.  In Belgium, which was the location of the Western Front in its Flanders provinces, the soil  was torn up by miles of trenches and pocked by bomb craters and artillery fire.

 

After the second battle of Ypres in May 1915, in an area known as Flanders Fields, red poppies began to bloom in a cemetery.  A Canadian doctor named Lt. Col John McCrae was inspired to write a poem, In Flanders Fields, which reflects on the vitality of the red poppies and encourages people to take up the torch in honor of their fallen countrymen. It went on to become WWI’s most recognized poem and a powerful recruiting tool.

 

Poppies continue to dot the places that were scarred by World War I – a blooming symbol of a bloody conflict that changed the world forever.

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Contact

(804) 796-7121

Address

P.O. Box 40

10111 Iron Bridge Rd, Chesterfield, VA 23832, USA

©2017 BY CHESTERFIELD HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF VIRGINIA.